Christian Life, Mental Health

Girl Stop Apologizing & More

Web_girlstopapologizing

Have you gotten your hands on a copy of Rachel Hollis’ latest book, Girl Stop Apologizing? Rachel lays out important actions she has taken to attain her level of success. In a world of people telling you to just follow yours dreams, Rachel explains that you can’t just dream, sit back and hope for the best. Achieving big dreams requires hard work, a plan, discipline, and sacrifice.

Rachel’s message is that we need to stop apologizing for who we are and how we are “wired.” We have to stop making excuses for why we aren’t succeeding and stop blaming others for our lack of progress. She shares what keeps her on track like her 10-10-1 rule, getting up an hour earlier than her family, finding a place to work that is not distracting, avoiding time-wasters like social media, eating healthy, exercising daily, creating measurable goals, enlisting help, being a hustler, and so forth.

I love Rachel’s personal examples and practical advice. If people put into practice just a few of her life-principles, they are sure to reap the benefits. This book is not about theology. It’s not about living a Christian life-style. It’s not even about being a mom. This book has a purpose and it hit the bullseye. Rachel talks about her personal health and fitness through eating, sleeping, and exercise, but she does not talk about taking days off. That was not the point of her book so I have no complaints for her leaving it out.

One of the stories Rachel shared was how she decided to forego resting at an airport, even though she was exhausted, so that she could work on her book edits. She mentioned that she was willing to sacrifice rest in order to meet her objectives. This story made me think about how many people out there sacrifice rest in order to be productive.

Many people have no idea that rest is an important part of increasing productivity. Medical research reveals that the brain needs days off in order to restore itself. Many studies even connect REM sleep to emotional memory processing (Walker & van der Helm, 2009). Professional athletes and trainers will tell you that you must take one day off a week for your muscles to rest and restore. The Bible even talks about how we should take a day off for sabbath rest (Exodus 20:8-11). Without rest at least one day per week, we end up being less productive on the other six days.

My encouragement is to read Rachel’s book and figure out how to apply it to your life. However, don’t become a “hustler” and neglect to take days to reset and restore in the process. Achieving your goals while being emotionally, physically, mentally, spiritually, and relationally healthy is what will make you a real success story.

 

 

Reference

Walker, M. P., & van der Helm, E. (2009). Overnight therapy? The role of sleep in emotional brain processing. Psychological bulletin, 135(5), 731-48.

 

 

Christian Life

The Product of Restoration

I am passionate about RESTORATION.

As a pastor, there is no greater joy than becoming friends with a person who is down and out, helping them find hope through a relationship with Jesus and then walking beside them as He transforms their lives from the inside out. No matter what tragedies a person has faced or how many things they have done wrong, the God and creator of the universe desires to restore and rehabilitate.

This passion for restoration overflows into many aspects of my life. It is so fulfilling to take other peoples’ junk and repurpose it for a new life. My little hobby is fun and rewarding, but it doesn’t compare to what Christ can do for each and every one of us.

Take a look at three café tables I recently
made out of old barn boards and scrap wood:

Table1

Wood donated from a friend

 Table2

Cut to random widths for the table tops

Table3

Plywood bottom glued & screwed to the boards

Table4

Before sanding & finishing

Table5

Table edges were finished with a wood veneer.
Created the weathered wood effect by smearing
the wood with a cloth that was dipped 
in acetone
and black paint. Sealed with a polyurethane

and legs screwed on. ($3.50 each from Ikea)

Table6